Jul
16

The Poetry Essay: Understanding Meaning vs. Listing Devices (AP® Annual Conference)

Created by nicole.desiato Employee on Mar 24, 2016

Saturday, July 16, 2016 at Anaheim Convention Center: 2nd Level, Room 207D, AP® Annual Conference, Anaheim, CA

Starts at 9:00 AM · Ends at 10:15 AM, EDT (America/New_York)

  • nicole.desiato

Author Renee Shea presents at the AP® Annual Conference in Anaheim, CA.

 

The greatest impediment to successful poetry analysis is that students find it difficult to identify meaning. Yet when teachers ask students to study poems, we unwittingly compound this situation. We ask students to dissect a decontextualized poem into poetic devices and then urge them to rearticulate the parts to arrive at conclusions about meaning. When they lack the cultural and historical background to accomplish this task, even strong readers write superficial essays about effects rather than meaning. This session builds on the premise that, like other discursive texts, the meaning of a complex poem is shaped by context — by the political, social, aesthetic, historical, or cultural currents from which it emerges. During the session, teachers will learn four distinct ways of contextualizing poetry in the classroom and four strategies for guiding students from close reading and context cues to writing substantive essays about meaning. Participants will leave with a packet of materials.

 

If you are interested, please RSVP and more information will be posted here.

 

Check out Renee's other session at AP® Annual: The Rhetoric of Now (AP* Annual Conference)

 

The   greatest impediment to successful poetry analysis is that students find it   difficult to identify meaning. Yet when teachers ask students to study poems,   we unwittingly compound this situation. We ask students to dissect a   decontextualized poem into poetic devices and then urge them to rearticulate   the parts to arrive at conclusions about meaning. When they lack the cultural   and historical background to accomplish this task, even strong readers write   superficial essays about effects rather than meaning. This session builds on   the premise that, like other discursive texts, the meaning of a complex poem   is shaped by context — by the political, social, aesthetic, historical, or   cultural currents from which it emerges. During the session, teachers will learn   four distinct ways of contextualizing poetry in the classroom and four   strategies for guiding students from close reading and context cues to   writing substantive essays about meaning. Participants will leave with a   packet of materials.

Anaheim Convention Center: 2nd Level, Room 207D, AP® Annual Conference, Anaheim, CA