jrupert

America's History- IM7 Standard Alignment

Blog Post created by jrupert Employee on Jul 21, 2016

BID ID:

3190

SUBMISSION TITLE:

America's History

GRADE LEVEL:

9 - 12

COURSE TITLE:

United States History Honors

COURSE CODE:

2100320

ISBN:

1319084850

PUBLISHER:

Bedford, Freeman and Worth Publishing Group, LLC

PUBLISHER ID:

America’s History, Eighth Edition

Henretta, Hinderaker, Edwards and Self

©2014 Bedeford/St. Martin’s

correlated to

Florida United States Honors History Standards

Name

Description

Citations

ELD.K12.ELL.SI.1:

English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting.

37-38, 72-73, 111-112, 143-144, 179-180, 211-212, 245-246, 277-278, 311-312, 341-342, 373-374, 404-405, 440-441, 475-476, 505-506, 536-537, 571-572, 603-604, 633-634, 665-666, 700-701, 730-731, 763-764, 797-798, 834-835, 865-866, 899-900, 933-934, 965-966, 999-1000, 1033-1034 ELD.K12.ELL.SS.1:

English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content

37-38, 72-73, 111-112, 143-144, 179-180, 211-212, 245-246, 277-278, 311-312, 341-342, 373-374, 404-405, 440-441, 475-476, 505-

2

area of Social Studies.

506, 536-537, 571-572, 603-604, 633-634, 665-666, 700-701, 730-731, 763-764, 797-798, 834-835, 865-866, 899-900, 933-934, 965-966, 999-1000, 1033-1034

HE.912.C.2.4:

Evaluate how public health policies and government regulations can influence health promotion and disease prevention.

Not applicable LAFS.1112.RH.1.1:

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

26-27, 50-51, 98-99, 118-119, 164-165, 192-193, 220-221, 252-253, 298-299, 336-337, 358-359, 384-385, 434-435, 458-459, 502-503, 530-531, 554-555, 578-579, 620-621, 640-641, 692-693, 716-717, 752-753, 784-785, 810-811, 858-859, 888-889, 916-917, 940-941, 990-991, 1006-1007

LAFS.1112.RH.1.2:

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

32-33, 68-69, 108-109, 130-131, 172-173, 208-209, 238-239, 260-261, 308-309, 328-329, 368-369, 384-385, 422-423, 472-473, 488-489, 522-523, 562-563, 596-597, 630-631, 658-659, 680-681, 722-723, 742-743, 778-779, 822-823, 852-853, 884-885, 912-913, 954-955, 978-979, 1016-1017 LAFS.1112.RH.1.3:

Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

26-27, 50-51, 98-99, 118-119, 164-165, 192-193, 220-221, 252-253, 298-299, 336-337, 358-359, 384-385, 434-435, 458-459, 502-503, 530-531, 554-555, 578-579, 620-621, 640-641, 692-693, 716-717, 752-753, 784-785, 810-811, 858-859, 888-889, 916-917, 940-941, 990-991, 1006-1007

LAFS.1112.RH.2.4:

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No.

37-38, 72-73, 111-112, 143-144, 179-180, 211-212, 245-246, 277-278, 311-312, 341-342, 373-374, 404-405, 440-441, 475-476, 505-506, 536-537, 571-572, 603-604, 633-634, 665-666, 700-701, 730-731, 763-764, 797-798, 834-835,

3

10).

865-866, 899-900, 933-934, 965-966, 999-1000, 1033-1034 LAFS.1112.RH.2.5:

Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.

32-33, 68-69, 108-109, 130-131, 172-173, 208-209, 238-239, 260-261, 308-309, 328-329, 368-369, 384-385, 422-423, 472-473, 488-489, 522-523, 562-563, 596-597, 630-631, 658-659, 680-681, 722-723, 742-743, 778-779, 822-823, 852-853, 884-885, 912-913, 954-955, 978-979, 1016-1017

LAFS.1112.RH.2.6:

Evaluate authors’ differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors’ claims, reasoning, and evidence.

32-33, 68-69, 108-109, 130-131, 172-173, 208-209, 238-239, 260-261, 308-309, 328-329, 368-369, 384-385, 422-423, 472-473, 488-489, 522-523, 562-563, 596-597, 630-631, 658-659, 680-681, 722-723, 742-743, 778-779, 822-823, 852-853, 884-885, 912-913, 954-955, 978-979, 1016-1017 LAFS.1112.RH.3.7:

Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

32-33, 68-69, 108-109, 130-131, 172-173, 208-209, 238-239, 260-261, 308-309, 328-329, 368-369, 384-385, 422-423, 472-473, 488-489, 522-523, 562-563, 596-597, 630-631, 658-659, 680-681, 722-723, 742-743, 778-779, 822-823, 852-853, 884-885, 912-913, 954-955, 978-979, 1016-1017

LAFS.1112.RH.3.8:

Evaluate an author’s premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.

26-27, 50-51, 98-99, 118-119, 164-165, 192-193, 220-221, 252-253, 298-299, 336-337, 358-359, 384-385, 434-435, 458-459, 502-503, 530-531, 554-555, 578-579, 620-621, 640-641, 692-693, 716-717, 752-753, 784-785, 810-811, 858-859, 888-889, 916-917, 940-941, 990-991, 1006-1007 LAFS.1112.RH.3.9:

Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

14, 57, 95, 121, 153, 197, 224, 272, 289, 317, 372, 387, 426, 461, 482, 514, 560, 601, 611, 653, 689, 727, 737, 774, 814, 860, 876, 920, 946, 988, 1008

4

LAFS.1112.RH.4.10:

By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 11–CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently.

37-38, 72-73, 111-112, 143-144, 179-180, 211-212, 245-246, 277-278, 311-312, 341-342, 373-374, 404-405, 440-441, 475-476, 505-506, 536-537, 571-572, 603-604, 633-634, 665-666, 700-701, 730-731, 763-764, 797-798, 834-835, 865-866, 899-900, 933-934, 965-966, 999-1000, 1033-1034 LAFS.1112.SL.1.1:

Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

b. Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.

c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and

72-73, 111-112, 143-144, 179-180, 211-212, 245-246, 277-278, 311-312, 341-342, 373-374, 404-405, 440-441, 475-476, 505-506, 536-537, 571-572, 603-604, 633-634, 665-666, 700-701, 730-731, 763-764, 797-798, 834-835, 865-866, 899-900, 933-934, 965-966, 999-1000, 1033-1034

5

creative perspectives.

d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

LAFS.1112.SL.1.2:

Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.

38, 73, 112, 144, 180, 212, 246, 278, 312, 342, 374, 405, 441, 476, 506, 537, 572, 604, 634, 666, 701, 731, 764, 798, 835, 866, 900, 934, 966, 1000, 1034 LAFS.1112.SL.1.3:

Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.

Not applicable

LAFS.1112.SL.2.4:

Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.

38, 73, 112, 144, 180, 212, 246, 278, 312, 342, 374, 405, 441, 476, 506, 537, 572, 604, 634, 666, 701, 731, 764, 798, 835, 866, 900, 934, 966, 1000, 1034 LAFS.1112.WHST.1.1:

Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.

a. Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of

38, 73, 112, 144, 180, 212, 246, 278, 312, 342, 374, 405, 441, 476, 506, 537, 572, 604, 634, 666, 701, 731, 764, 798, 835, 866, 900, 934, 966, 1000, 1034

6

the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.

c. Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from or supports the argument presented.

LAFS.1112.WHST.1.2:

Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or

38, 73, 112, 144, 180, 212, 246, 278, 312, 342, 374, 405, 441, 476, 506, 537, 572, 604, 634, 666, 701, 731, 764, 798, 835, 866, 900, 934,

7

technical processes.

a. Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

b. Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

c. Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

d. Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic; convey a knowledgeable stance in a style that responds to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers.

e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports

966, 1000, 1034

8

the information or explanation provided (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic). LAFS.1112.WHST.2.4:

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

38, 73, 112, 144, 180, 212, 246, 278, 312, 342, 374, 405, 441, 476, 506, 537, 572, 604, 634, 666, 701, 731, 764, 798, 835, 866, 900, 934, 966, 1000, 1034

LAFS.1112.WHST.2.5:

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

38, 73, 112, 144, 180, 212, 246, 278, 312, 342, 374, 405, 441, 476, 506, 537, 572, 604, 634, 666, 701, 731, 764, 798, 835, 866, 900, 934, 966, 1000, 1034 LAFS.1112.WHST.2.6:

Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

38, 73, 112, 144, 180, 212, 246, 278, 312, 342, 374, 405, 441, 476, 506, 537, 572, 604, 634, 666, 701, 731, 764, 798, 835, 866, 900, 934, 966, 1000, 1034

LAFS.1112.WHST.3.7:

Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

14, 57, 95, 121, 153, 197, 224, 272, 289, 317, 372, 387, 426, 461, 482, 514, 560, 601, 611, 653, 689, 727, 737, 774, 814, 860, 876, 920, 946, 988, 1008 LAFS.1112.WHST.3.8:

Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and

32-33, 68-69, 108-109, 130-131, 172-173, 208-209, 238-239, 260-261, 308-309, 328-329, 368-369, 384-385, 422-423, 472-473, 488-489, 522-523, 562-563, 596-597, 630-631, 658-659, 680-681, 722-723, 742-743, 778-779, 822-823, 852-853, 884-885, 912-913, 954-955, 978-979, 1016-1017

9

following a standard format for citation.

LAFS.1112.WHST.3.9:

Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

14, 57, 95, 121, 153, 197, 224, 272, 289, 317, 372, 387, 426, 461, 482, 514, 560, 601, 611, 653, 689, 727, 737, 774, 814, 860, 876, 920, 946, 988, 1008 LAFS.1112.WHST.4.10:

Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

38, 73, 112, 144, 180, 212, 246, 278, 312, 342, 374, 405, 441, 476, 506, 537, 572, 604, 634, 666, 701, 731, 764, 798, 835, 866, 900, 934, 966, 1000, 1034

MAFS.K12.MP.1.1:

Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

Mathematically proficient students start by explaining to themselves the meaning of a problem and looking for entry points to its solution. They analyze givens, constraints, relationships, and goals. They make conjectures about the form and meaning of the solution and plan a solution pathway rather than simply jumping into a solution attempt. They consider analogous problems, and try special cases and simpler forms of the original problem in order to gain insight into its solution. They monitor and evaluate their progress and change course if necessary. Older students might, depending on the context of the problem, transform algebraic expressions or change the viewing window on their graphing calculator to get the information they need. Mathematically proficient students can explain correspondences between equations, verbal descriptions, tables, and graphs or draw

Not applicable

10

diagrams of important features and relationships, graph data, and search for regularity or trends. Younger students might rely on using concrete objects or pictures to help conceptualize and solve a problem. Mathematically proficient students check their answers to problems using a different method, and they continually ask themselves, “Does this make sense?” They can understand the approaches of others to solving complex problems and identify correspondences between different approaches. MAFS.K12.MP.3.1:

Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and—if there is a flaw in an argument—explain what it is.

Not applicable

11

Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.

MAFS.K12.MP.5.1:

Use appropriate tools strategically. Mathematically proficient students consider the available tools when solving a mathematical problem. These tools might include pencil and paper, concrete models, a ruler, a protractor, a calculator, a spreadsheet, a computer algebra system, a statistical package, or dynamic geometry software. Proficient students are sufficiently familiar with tools appropriate for their grade or course to make sound decisions about when each of these tools might be helpful, recognizing both the insight to be gained and their limitations. For example, mathematically proficient high school students analyze graphs of functions and solutions generated using a graphing calculator. They detect possible errors by strategically using estimation and other mathematical knowledge. When making mathematical models, they know that technology can enable them to visualize the results of varying

Not applicable

12

assumptions, explore consequences, and compare predictions with data. Mathematically proficient students at various grade levels are able to identify relevant external mathematical resources, such as digital content located on a website, and use them to pose or solve problems. They are able to use technological tools to explore and deepen their understanding of concepts. MAFS.K12.MP.6.1:

Attend to precision.

Mathematically proficient students try to communicate precisely to others. They try to use clear definitions in discussion with others and in their own reasoning. They state the meaning of the symbols they choose, including using the equal sign consistently and appropriately. They are careful about specifying units of measure, and labeling axes to clarify the correspondence with quantities in a problem. They calculate accurately and efficiently, express numerical answers with a degree of precision appropriate for the problem context. In the elementary grades, students give carefully formulated explanations to each other. By the time they reach high school they have learned to examine claims and make explicit use of definitions.

Not applicable

SS.912.A.1.1:

Describe the importance of historiography, which includes how historical knowledge is obtained and transmitted, when interpreting events in history.

26-27, 50-51, 98-99, 118-119, 164-165, 192-193, 220-221, 252-253, 298-299, 336-337, 358-359, 384-385, 434-435, 458-459, 502-503, 530-531, 554-555, 578-579, 620-621, 640-641, 692-693, 716-

13

717, 752-753, 784-785, 810-811, 858-859, 888-889, 916-917, 940-941, 990-991, 1006-1007 SS.912.A.1.2:

Utilize a variety of primary and secondary sources to identify author, historical significance, audience, and authenticity to understand a historical period.

32-33, 68-69, 108-109, 130-131, 172-173, 208-209, 238-239, 260-261, 308-309, 328-329, 368-369, 384-385, 422-423, 472-473, 488-489, 522-523, 562-563, 596-597, 630-631, 658-659, 680-681, 722-723, 742-743, 778-779, 822-823, 852-853, 884-885, 912-913, 954-955, 978-979, 1016-1017

SS.912.A.1.3:

Utilize timelines to identify the time sequence of historical data.

39, 74, 113, 145, 181, 213, 247, 279, 313, 343, 375, 406, 442, 477, 507, 538, 573, 605, 635, 667, 702, 732, 765, 799, 836, 867, 901, 935, 967, 1001, 1035 SS.912.A.1.4:

Analyze how images, symbols, objects, cartoons, graphs, charts, maps, and artwork may be used to interpret the significance of time periods and events from the past.

26-27, 50-51, 98-99, 118-119, 164-165, 192-193, 220-221, 252-253, 298-299, 336-337, 358-359, 384-385, 434-435, 458-459, 502-503, 530-531, 554-555, 578-579, 620-621, 640-641, 692-693, 716-717, 752-753, 784-785, 810-811, 858-859, 888-889, 916-917, 940-941, 990-991, 1006-1007

SS.912.A.1.5:

Evaluate the validity, reliability, bias, and authenticity of current events and Internet resources.

32-33, 68-69, 108-109, 130-131, 172-173, 208-209, 238-239, 260-261, 308-309, 328-329, 368-369, 384-385, 422-423, 472-473, 488-489, 522-523, 562-563, 596-597, 630-631, 658-659, 680-681, 722-723, 742-743, 778-779, 822-823, 852-853, 884-885, 912-913, 954-955, 978-979, 1016-1017 SS.912.A.1.6:

Use case studies to explore social, political, legal, and economic relationships in history.

14, 57, 95, 121, 153, 197, 224, 272, 289, 317, 372, 387, 426, 461, 482, 514, 560, 601, 611, 653, 689, 727, 737, 774, 814, 860, 876, 920, 946, 988, 1008

SS.912.A.1.7:

Describe various socio-cultural aspects of American life including arts, artifacts, literature, education, and publications.

37-38, 72-73, 111-112, 143-144, 179-180, 211-212, 245-246, 277-278, 311-312, 341-342, 373-374, 404-405, 440-441, 475-476, 505-

14

506, 536-537, 571-572, 603-604, 633-634, 665-666, 700-701, 730-731, 763-764, 797-798, 834-835, 865-866, 899-900, 933-934, 965-966, 999-1000, 1033-1034 SS.912.A.2.1:

Review causes and consequences of the Civil War.

482-491

SS.912.A.2.2:

Assess the influence of significant people or groups on Reconstruction.

514-521, 569-576 SS.912.A.2.3:

Describe the issues that divided Republicans during the early Reconstruction era.

514-521

SS.912.A.2.4:

Distinguish the freedoms guaranteed to African Americans and other groups with the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the Constitution.

580-583, 592 SS.912.A.2.5:

Assess how Jim Crow Laws influenced life for African Americans and other racial/ethnic minority groups.

520, 582, 594, 604

SS.912.A.2.6:

Compare the effects of the Black Codes and the Nadir on freed people, and analyze the sharecropping system and debt peonage as practiced in the United States.

527, 599, 799 SS.912.A.2.7:

Review the Native American experience.

613-637

SS.912.A.3.1:

Analyze the economic challenges to American farmers and farmers' responses to these challenges in the mid to late 1800s.

593-605 SS.912.A.3.10:

Review different economic and philosophic ideologies.

593-605

15

SS.912.A.3.11:

Analyze the impact of political machines in United States cities in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

594, 598, 631, 641 SS.912.A.3.12:

Compare how different nongovernmental organizations and progressives worked to shape public policy, restore economic opportunities, and correct injustices in American life.

624-634

SS.912.A.3.13:

Examine key events and peoples in Florida history as they relate to United States history.

635-636 SS.912.A.3.2:

Examine the social, political, and economic causes, course, and consequences of the second Industrial Revolution that began in the late 19th century.

635-636

SS.912.A.3.3:

Compare the first and second Industrial Revolutions in the United States.

508-513, 609, 632, 640 SS.912.A.3.4:

Determine how the development of steel, oil, transportation, communication, and business practices affected the United States economy.

645-646, 657-662

SS.912.A.3.5:

Identify significant inventors of the Industrial Revolution including African Americans and women.

643-656 SS.912.A.3.6:

Analyze changes that occurred as the United States shifted from agrarian to an industrial society.

640-652

SS.912.A.3.7:

Compare the experience of European immigrants in the east to that of Asian immigrants in the west (the Chinese Exclusion Act,

657-660

16

Gentlemen's Agreement with Japan). SS.912.A.3.8:

Examine the importance of social change and reform in the late 19th and early 20th centuries (class system, migration from farms to cities, Social Gospel movement, role of settlement houses and churches in providing services to the poor).

657-662

SS.912.A.3.9:

Examine causes, course, and consequences of the labor movement in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

666-692 SS.912.A.4.1:

Analyze the major factors that drove United States imperialism.

666-670

SS.912.A.4.10:

Examine the provisions of the Treaty of Versailles and the failure of the United States to support the League of Nations.

670-691 SS.912.A.4.11:

Examine key events and peoples in Florida history as they relate to United States history.

678-691

SS.912.A.4.2:

Explain the motives of the United States acquisition of the territories.

699-700 SS.912.A.4.3:

Examine causes, course, and consequences of the Spanish American War.

695-698

SS.912.A.4.4:

Analyze the economic, military, and security motivations of the United States to complete the Panama Canal as well as major obstacles involved in its construction.

635-636, 701-702, 715-723 SS.912.A.4.5:

Examine causes, course, and

715-723

17

consequences of United States involvement in World War I.

SS.912.A.4.6:

Examine how the United States government prepared the nation for war with war measures (Selective Service Act, War Industries Board, war bonds, Espionage Act, Sedition Act, Committee of Public Information).

718, 723 SS.912.A.4.7:

Examine the impact of airplanes, battleships, new weaponry and chemical warfare in creating new war strategies (trench warfare, convoys).

713-715

SS.912.A.4.8:

Compare the experiences Americans (African Americans, Hispanics, Asians, women, conscientious objectors) had while serving in Europe.

702-710 SS.912.A.4.9:

Compare how the war impacted German Americans, Asian Americans, African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Jewish Americans, Native Americans, women and dissenters in the United States.

710-715

SS.912.A.5.1:

Discuss the economic outcomes of demobilization.

731-758 SS.912.A.5.10:

Analyze support for and resistance to civil rights for women, African Americans, Native Americans, and other minorities.

731-758

SS.912.A.5.11:

Examine causes, course, and consequences of the Great Depression and the New Deal.

789-804 SS.912.A.5.12:

Examine key events and people in Florida history as they relate to United States history.

528, 798-800, 844

SS.912.A.5.2:

Explain the causes of the public reaction (Sacco and Vanzetti, labor, racial unrest) associated with

761-786

18

the Red Scare. SS.912.A.5.3:

Examine the impact of United States foreign economic policy during the 1920s.

801-817

SS.912.A.5.4:

Evaluate how the economic boom during the Roaring Twenties changed consumers, businesses, manufacturing, and marketing practices.

801-812 SS.912.A.5.5:

Describe efforts by the United States and other world powers to avoid future wars.

820-825

SS.912.A.5.6:

Analyze the influence that Hollywood, the Harlem Renaissance, the Fundamentalist movement, and prohibition had in changing American society in the 1920s.

756, 779-780, 823, 852-853 SS.912.A.5.7:

Examine the freedom movements that advocated civil rights for African Americans, Latinos, Asians, and women.

845, 869, 799

SS.912.A.5.8:

Compare the views of Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, and Marcus Garvey relating to the African American experience.

824-825, 838-840, 863-868 SS.912.A.5.9:

Explain why support for the Ku Klux Klan varied in the 1920s with respect to issues such as anti-immigration, anti-African American, anti-Catholic, anti-Jewish, anti-women, and anti-union ideas.

824-825, 829-840, 844-845, 852-853, 863-868, 872-875

SS.912.A.6.1:

Examine causes, course, and consequences of World War II on the United States and the world.

755-757 SS.912.A.6.10:

Examine causes, course, and consequences of the early years of

826-837, 841-846

19

the Cold War (Truman Doctrine, Marshall Plan, NATO, Warsaw Pact).

SS.912.A.6.11:

Examine the controversy surrounding the proliferation of nuclear technology in the United States and the world.

826-837, 841-846 SS.912.A.6.12:

Examine causes, course, and consequences of the Korean War.

859-861

SS.912.A.6.13:

Analyze significant foreign policy events during the Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon administrations.

883-909, 912-940 SS.912.A.6.14:

Analyze causes, course, and consequences of the Vietnam War.

900-901, 917-918

SS.912.A.6.15:

Examine key events and peoples in Florida history as they relate to United States history.

890-900 SS.912.A.6.2:

Describe the United States response in the early years of World War II (Neutrality Acts, Cash and Carry, Lend Lease Act).

891-899

SS.912.A.6.3:

Analyze the impact of the Holocaust during World War II on Jews as well as other groups.

901-908 SS.912.A.6.4:

Examine efforts to expand or contract rights for various populations during World War II.

926-936

SS.912.A.6.5:

Explain the impact of World War II on domestic government policy.

931 SS.912.A.6.6:

Analyze the use of atomic weapons during World War II and the aftermath of the bombings.

911, 932-934

SS.912.A.6.7:

Describe the attempts to promote international justice through the Nuremberg Trials.

912-917

20

SS.912.A.6.8:

Analyze the effects of the Red Scare on domestic United States policy.

699-700

SS.912.A.6.9:

Describe the rationale for the formation of the United Nations, including the contribution of Mary McLeod Bethune.

695-698 SS.912.A.7.1:

Identify causes for Post-World War II prosperity and its effects on American society.

635-636, 701-702, 715-723

SS.912.A.7.10:

Analyze the significance of Vietnam and Watergate on the government and people of the United States.

715-723 SS.912.A.7.11:

Analyze the foreign policy of the United States as it relates to Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America, and the Middle East.

718, 723

SS.912.A.7.12:

Analyze political, economic, and social concerns that emerged at the end of the 20th century and into the 21st century.

713-715 SS.912.A.7.13:

Analyze the attempts to extend New Deal legislation through the Great Society and the successes and failures of these programs to promote social and economic stability.

702-710

SS.912.A.7.14:

Review the role of the United States as a participant in the global economy (trade agreements, international competition, impact on American labor, environmental concerns).

710-715 SS.912.A.7.15:

Analyze the effects of foreign and

731-758

21

domestic terrorism on the American people.

SS.912.A.7.16:

Examine changes in immigration policy and attitudes toward immigration since 1950.

731-758 SS.912.A.7.17:

Examine key events and key people in Florida history as they relate to United States history.

12, 139, 156, 243, 326, 331, 378, 401, 446, 500, 862, 10313

SS.912.A.7.2:

Compare the relative prosperity between different ethnic groups and social classes in the post-World War II period.

528, 798-800, 844 SS.912.A.7.3:

Examine the changing status of women in the United States from post-World War II to present.

761-786

SS.912.A.7.4:

Evaluate the success of 1960s era presidents' foreign and domestic policies.

801-817 SS.912.A.7.5:

Compare nonviolent and violent approaches utilized by groups (African Americans, women, Native Americans, Hispanics) to achieve civil rights.

801-812

SS.912.A.7.6:

Assess key figures and organizations in shaping the Civil Rights Movement and Black Power Movement.

820-825 SS.912.A.7.7:

Assess the building of coalitions between African Americans, whites, and other groups in achieving integration and equal rights.

756, 779-780, 823, 852-853

SS.912.A.7.8:

Analyze significant Supreme Court decisions relating to integration, busing, affirmative action, the rights of the accused, and

845, 869, 799

22

reproductive rights. SS.912.A.7.9:

Examine the similarities of social movements (Native Americans, Hispanics, women, anti-war protesters) of the 1960s and 1970s.

824-825, 838-840, 863-868

SS.912.G.1.2:

Use spatial perspective and appropriate geographic terms and tools, including the Six Essential Elements, as organizational schema to describe any given place.

824-825, 829-840, 844-845, 852-853, 863-868, 872-875 SS.912.G.1.3:

Employ applicable units of measurement and scale to solve simple locational problems using maps and globes.

755-757

SS.912.G.2.1:

Identify the physical characteristics and the human characteristics that define and differentiate regions.

826-837, 841-846 SS.912.G.4.2:

Use geographic terms and tools to analyze the push/pull factors contributing to human migration within and among places.

826-837, 841-846

SS.912.G.4.3:

Use geographic terms and tools to analyze the effects of migration both on the place of origin and destination, including border areas.

859-861 SS.912.H.1.1:

Relate works in the arts (architecture, dance, music, theatre, and visual arts) of varying styles and genre according to the periods in which they were created.

883-909, 912-940

SS.912.H.1.3:

Relate works in the arts to various cultures.

900-901, 917-918 SS.912.H.1.5:

Examine artistic response to social issues and new ideas in various cultures.

890-900

SS.912.H.3.1:

Analyze the effects of transportation, trade,

891-899

23

communication, science, and technology on the preservation and diffusion of culture.

Outcomes